If anyone wants to become a Christian, don’t send him into the churches, but into the slums. There he will find Christ.
Jürgen Moltmann, The Crucified God: The Cross of Christ as the Foundation and Criticism of Christian Theology, p. 12 (via shneevon)
If you live in Tallahassee and are interested in animal rights activism

I’m trying to start a Facebook group where we can connect and be more active for animals in our area. 

Join the group here

 https://www.facebook.com/groups/678487075543535/

thepeoplesrecord:

Meet the Lakota Tribe woman teaching thousands how to resist the Keystone XL Pipeline
April 14, 2014

On March 29, a caravan of more than 100 cars plodded along the wide open roads of the Rosebud reservation in South Dakota, stopped at a forlorn former corn field and prepared for battle. 

Leaders from eight tribes in South Dakota and Minnesota pitched their flags. Participants erected nine tipis, a prayer lodge and a cook shack, surrounding their camp with a wall of 1,500-pound hay bales. Elders said they would camp out indefinitely. Speakers said they were willing to die for their cause.

This spirit camp at the Sicangu Lakota Rosebud reservation was the most visible recent action in Indian Country over the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. But it was hardly the first … or the last.

On the neighboring Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Debra White Plume, an activist and community organizer involved in Oglala Lakota cultural preservation for more than 40 years, has been leading marches, civil disobedience training camps and educational forums on the Keystone XL since the pipeline was proposed in 2008.

White Plume, founder of the activists groups Owe Aku (Bring Back the Way), the International Justice Project and Moccasins on the Ground, has crisscrossed the country, marched on Washington and testified at the United Nations against the environmental devastation of tar sands oil mining and transport. Now, perhaps only weeks before President Obama is set to announce whether to allow a private oil company, TransCanada, to plow through the heartland to transport tar sand crude from Alberta to Gulf Coast refineries for export, White Plume is busier than ever. 

White Plume is leading a galvanized, international coalition of grassroots environmental activists, the largest and most diverse in decades, in the last fight against the Keystone XL. The coalition is planning massive actions against the Keystone XL in Washington, D.C. and in local communities from April 22 (Earth Day) through April 27. In what is a first in decades, indigenous tribes from the heartland will be joined with farmers and ranchers along the proposed Keystone XL pipeline route in the actions. The “Cowboy and Indian Alliance” is inviting everyone in the country to their tipi camp on the National Mall in the hopes that a show of strength will steel President Obama’s resolve to be the “environmental President.” 

Since the State Department implicitly signed off on the Keystone XL pipeline in February by announcing that its environmental impact statement had found no “significant” impacts to worry about, White Plume and other environmental leaders concerned about the Keystone XL’s impact on climate change have also stepped up their plans for direct, non-violence civil disobedience. Those plans are under wraps, but blockades will surely be a major weapon in their arsenal.

White Plume talked about why the Keystone XL pipeline has become such a firestorm.   

* * *

Evelyn NievesWhy is it so important that the Keystone XL pipeline NOT become a reality?

Debra White Plume: The tar sands bitumen inside the KXL pipeline is hazardous, flammable, a carcinogen — and deadly. When it gets into our drinking water and surface water, it cannot be cleaned up. These pipelines further the development of the tar sands sacrifice area in Alberta.

ENWho is involved in the activism surrounding the opposition to the pipeline? Stories talk about this as a women’s movement, an elders movement and a youth movement. That means it’s pretty much everyone’s movement except for middle-aged men.

DWP: That might be true elsewhere, but all of our people are engaged to protect sacred water. I can’t speak for any middle-aged American men, but I know there are hundreds of American ranchers and farmers in South Dakota and Nebraska ready to defend their rights. Our Lakota warriors are opposing the KXL — this includes men and women.

ENWhat sorts of direct action are you willing to take and what kind of support are you receiving from Indian Country in general?

DWP: We will blockade TransCanada’s KXL to protect our lands and waters if we have to. Many tribal governments and Red Nations people have committed to blockade. Our Oglala Lakota Tribal Council is meeting soon to discuss declaring war on the KXL, as is the Rosebud Lakota Tribal Council.

EN:What kind of support are you receiving from outside of Indian Country?

DWP: We have support from all over the big land (so-called U.S.A.) and so-called Canada. We do not recognize these manmade borders. Our people were here from time immemorial, this is our ancestral land, people to the north and south are our relatives. We are connected through prophecy.

Full interview

This is always so scary, but it always helps me out..

If anyone has the time and or patience and would like to review my paper on prefacing animal liberation theology, I would greatly appreciate it. Please feel free to make changes, encourage changes, point out weaknesses, grammatical errors, poor choice of words, etc. If you are interested, please send me your email and I’ll shoot it your way.

lukexvx:

Thanks to shneevon for this cool line from last night, bringing Nouwen/Buber/Rollins/Matt 18:20 and 10:39 together

Desire can never be pursued directly. Look for truth and you’ll never find it. Look for love and you’ll never find it. Look for God you’ll never find God. We can’t pursue what we…

this is so good

violentcharity:

From left to right: Thomas Merton, Daniel Berrigan, Tony Walsh, and Philip Berrigan (on retreat at Gethsemani Abbey in August, 1962).

violentcharity:

From left to right: Thomas Merton, Daniel Berrigan, Tony Walsh, and Philip Berrigan (on retreat at Gethsemani Abbey in August, 1962).

Prayer does not consist merely in standing and bowing your body or in reading written prayers….it is possible to pray at all times, in all places, with mind and spirit. You can lift up your mind and heart to God while walking, sitting, working, in a crowd and in solitude. His door is always open, unlike man’s. We can always say to Him in our hearts, Lord, Lord, have mercy.
St Tikhon of Zadonsk (via antonyofva)
Fuck tough guy attitudes!

Yo, I know I haven’t been involved or shown my face in a while due to school and stuff, so some of you may not think there is any weight to what I’m saying due to my lack of involvement in hardcore recently, but I feel the urge to say this. Hardcore isn’t for hard people, and I’m sick of people using words like pussy, gay, etc. to describe people who aren’t “tough” or rowdy. If we were all so tough, we wouldn’t need hardcore or each other. This music that brought us all together, whether now, or in the past, is about finding refuge in a community that supports vulnerability.  I am not “tough”, I am not the person to fight someone else or beat the fuck out of someone at a show, but I get so much motivation from fast music and meaningful lyrics. Every person experiences something completely different at a show, some people get hit in the face, some hit others in the face, some stand in the back, some stand up front, some like the music, some like the lyrics, some like the friends and community, some get angry, some release anger, and some are encouraged to do things outside of hardcore to change communities that fucked most of us over in the first place. Regardless of how this music affects you, remember that it is something that bonds us as a community, not separates us. Who cares if someone doesn’t like the same bands as you, doesn’t dress like you, or isn’t from the same area…Diversity needs to be cherished and respected. It’s about having fun, feeling accepted, and having a voice in a community that is open to weakness and vulnerability. Ditch the attitude and realize that life exists outside of hardcore/shows/the B9 message board and all the hardcore blogs you follow on tumblr. Hang out with old friends, read a book, and stop acting like you’re a greek god.

thepeoplesrecord:

Uncontacted Indians ‘abandoned to their fate’ as loggers & drug smugglers invade landApril 5, 2014
Survival International warned today that the uncontacted Amazon Indians recently photographed from the airhave been abandoned to their fate after drug smugglers and illegal loggers overran a government post that had been monitoring the Indians’ territory.
The Indians, near the Xinane river in Brazil’s Acre State, are just over the border from Peru, where activists have long denounced the scale of illegal logging in isolated Indians’ territories.
The recently-photographed group also faces a serious threat from a road reportedly built into the area by the Acre state government – regional indigenous organizations have said this could devastate the uncontacted Indians on the Xinane River. Previous road-building projects in the Amazon have wiped out countless tribes.
In recent months several groups of uncontacted Mashco-Piro Indians have been spotted along river banks on the Peruvian side of the border, prompting further speculation that illegal logging is pushing them out of their previous isolation.
The Brazilian and Peruvian authorities last week signed an agreement to improve cross-border coordination, in an attempt to safeguard the welfare of the many uncontacted Indians living in the border region.
Survival has previously released extraordinary aerial footage of some of these uncontacted Indians: Watch the video here.
Nixiwaka Yawanawá is an Amazon Indian working with Survival to speak out for indigenous rights. He is from the same region as the tribe recently photographed. He said today, ‘They are my brothers. It is exciting to see that they are living in the way they want. The government must protect their territory; otherwise, they could be destroyed and the government would be responsible.’
Survival Director Stephen Corry said, ‘The only thing that will ensure the survival of modern-day uncontacted tribes is for their land to be protected. They have the right to decide whether to make contact with outside society, rather than be destroyed at the hands of an invading society. It’s vital that Brazil and Peru work together to protect the land of uncontacted tribes. History shows that when these rights aren’t upheld, disease, death and destruction follow.’
Source

The way we view and interact with the non-human world directly affects human and non-human animals alike. The problem here is not only that these individuals are being stripped of their rights, but that we enforce an ideology that says consumption is a part of the progression of humanity. If we don’t reshape out environmental philosophies, we will only continue to view ourselves as superior to all that is not like us (us meaning, those with power, technology, white skin, a penis, etc.) and associate those which are “uncivilized” or “primitive” as something to be dominated along with the non-human world. ugh… this makes me angry!

thepeoplesrecord:

Uncontacted Indians ‘abandoned to their fate’ as loggers & drug smugglers invade land
April 5, 2014

Survival International warned today that the uncontacted Amazon Indians recently photographed from the airhave been abandoned to their fate after drug smugglers and illegal loggers overran a government post that had been monitoring the Indians’ territory.

The Indians, near the Xinane river in Brazil’s Acre State, are just over the border from Peru, where activists have long denounced the scale of illegal logging in isolated Indians’ territories.

The recently-photographed group also faces a serious threat from a road reportedly built into the area by the Acre state government – regional indigenous organizations have said this could devastate the uncontacted Indians on the Xinane River. Previous road-building projects in the Amazon have wiped out countless tribes.

In recent months several groups of uncontacted Mashco-Piro Indians have been spotted along river banks on the Peruvian side of the border, prompting further speculation that illegal logging is pushing them out of their previous isolation.

The Brazilian and Peruvian authorities last week signed an agreement to improve cross-border coordination, in an attempt to safeguard the welfare of the many uncontacted Indians living in the border region.

Survival has previously released extraordinary aerial footage of some of these uncontacted Indians: Watch the video here.

Nixiwaka Yawanawá is an Amazon Indian working with Survival to speak out for indigenous rights. He is from the same region as the tribe recently photographed. He said today, ‘They are my brothers. It is exciting to see that they are living in the way they want. The government must protect their territory; otherwise, they could be destroyed and the government would be responsible.’

Survival Director Stephen Corry said, ‘The only thing that will ensure the survival of modern-day uncontacted tribes is for their land to be protected. They have the right to decide whether to make contact with outside society, rather than be destroyed at the hands of an invading society. It’s vital that Brazil and Peru work together to protect the land of uncontacted tribes. History shows that when these rights aren’t upheld, disease, death and destruction follow.’

Source

The way we view and interact with the non-human world directly affects human and non-human animals alike. The problem here is not only that these individuals are being stripped of their rights, but that we enforce an ideology that says consumption is a part of the progression of humanity. If we don’t reshape out environmental philosophies, we will only continue to view ourselves as superior to all that is not like us (us meaning, those with power, technology, white skin, a penis, etc.) and associate those which are “uncivilized” or “primitive” as something to be dominated along with the non-human world. ugh… this makes me angry!

Thoughts on Leafletting (words of encouragement)

I honestly don’t know if anyone cares, but..

This week I passed out information on veganism provided by Vegan Outreach. The leaflets were packed with great information, from information about the inhumane treatment of animals, to health information on vegan lifestyle choices. My overall experience in making the step to leaflet on campus, which is something I have never done before, was filled with mixed emotions. I would consider myself a reasonably outgoing person, but I would never have considered myself as the type of person that would say hi to a complete stranger, much less hand them information that will undoubtably challenge their views. The first day that I showed up on campus with the fliers, I sat in one place for several hours and watched hundreds of people flood past me while I held the flyers in my shaky hands. I ended up passing out a total of five fliers, and of those five that I handed out, I don’t think I said a single word that didn’t sound like I wasn’t sitting on a washing machine or working a jack hammer. I was so incredibly upset with myself that I thought about ditching the idea of leafletting. I was terrified, I was a hippie in Chacos passing out information to help animals, I felt sick, I was self conscious, I felt lonely, I felt defeated.

With all of this going through my head, I seriously considered throwing the information that I had away. Instead of throwing them away however, I decided to go against my instinct and try again two days later. I got out of class, walked to the area in front of the union where I knew I would encounter the most people and got out the fliers that I barely stopped myself from throwing away two days prior. I began to muster up the courage to pass out the fliers one at a time. Admittedly, it never became an easy task for me, but the more I began to pass out the easier it became. I thought about why I was doing what I was doing and continued to hold my hand out. I received many responses from people. I had people ignore me, politely say no, mock me, and laugh at me, but I also had people who gritted their teeth and took the information knowing that they were going to have their ideas about food challenged. To me the most rewarding part of the entire experience is watching the individuals immediately start reading the material as they walk away. Regardless of how nerve racking it is for me to stand and make a public spectacle of myself, BILLIONS of animals die every year so that people can eat their bodies, and leafletting is an incredibly easy and effective to spread information. 

I learned a lot about myself and how little my paranoia matters to the animals that are suffering and dying this very second. I certainly think that having someone else to leaflet with me would have been beneficial in many aspects, but now I know that I can do it alone and that is super encouraging to know. For some leafletting isn’t and will not be a big deal, but for people like me whose heart drops into the pit of their stomach and has to talk themselves into confronting someone who is passing by for ten minutes before you commit, I hope sharing my experience brings you some sort of encouragement. I understand that this type of thing isn’t for everyone, but you will never know until you try. Get out there and don’t be afraid to be honest with people, it’s incredibly scary, but there is something liberating in being honest. Don’t be afraid to tell people you are scared, don’t be afraid to ask others to join you. Push through the awkwardness and the fear, it is worth it for yourself and the animals!